This 400th anniversary campaign, carried out throughout 2013, is finished. The work to honor treaties with Native Nations and protect the Earth continues. Learn more, or join in that work: contact the Onondaga Nation, Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation, Neetopk Keetopk (Hudson Valley), Onondaga Canoe and Kayak Club or Two Row Paddle down the Grand (2016).

WAMC Radio Story

Handshake: Oren Lyons, Onondaga Nation Faithkeeper and a Two Row Wampum expert is pictured outside Albany City Hall with Albany Common Councilmember Cathy Fahey. Credit Dave Luca/WAMC

Handshake: Oren Lyons, Onondaga Nation Faithkeeper and a Two Row Wampum expert is pictured outside Albany City Hall with Albany Common Councilmember Cathy Fahey. Credit Dave Luca/WAMC

WAMC Northeast Public Radio produced a great story about the Two Row Campaign Listen here. The station, based in Albany, aired the story today, Friday, June 7. There are also extended interviews with Oren Lyons and Capital Region Two Row organizer Kevin Nephew on their website.

The story begins, “There’s a growing movement to spread the word that the first agreement made 400 years ago between Native Americans and European settlers is not only still valid, but has relevance today. In 1613 in what is now upstate New York, the first agreement was consecrated between indigenous peoples and interlopers from afar. Andy Mager is coordinator for the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign, says the current push to educate people about the Two Row Wampum is an initiative to look back at the pact, consider its relevance today, and share information about this “first treaty,” which many consider to still be in effect.”